April 12th CEO Roundtable Featuring Jan Lesher

Please join Tucson Young Professionals and listen to Jan Lesher, formerly serving Arizona Governor and Department of Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano

When/Where: April 12th, 5:30-7:00pm @ Sullivan’s Steakhouse

About CEO Roundtable:

Tucson Young Professionals holds a monthly CEO Roundtable as an avenue of professional development for our members and the community.

We ask our featured speaker to candidly speak for 30-35 minutes about their story of successes, pitfalls and laughs on their journey to becoming a successful leader.

The atmosphere is casual and conversational.

About Jan Lesher:

Lesher returned to her hometown in the spring of 2010 after serving former Arizona Governor and Department of Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano since January 2003.

Lesher served Secretary Napolitano as Chief of Staff for Operations, overseeing the daily activities of Agency’s 230,000 employees and $52 billion budget. Immediately prior to her move with the Secretary to Washington, DC, Lesher was the Governor’s Chief of Staff. Prior to being named to that position, Lesher served as Director of the Arizona Department of Commerce and the Director of the Governor’s Southern Arizona Office

Born, raised and educated in Tucson, her professional experience is extensive; she served as Vice-President of Communications and Marketing for the Tucson Economic Development Corporation, Executive Director of the Tucson Community Cable Corporation and Vice-President of Warner-Amex Cable. She founded Lesher Communications in 1990, handling corporate, public and government relations for various entities.

She has an impressive history of community involvement, including service as a member of the Board of Directors of the Commerce and Economic Development Commission; Arizona Town Hall; the Greater Arizona Development Authority; the Community Food Bank; and La Frontera. She was named a Woman of Influence by Inside Tucson Business and recognized with the Women Who Lead award from the University of Arizona Women’s Studies Advisory Council in 2004. She was honored as the Metropolitan Tucson Chamber of Commerce Woman of the Year in 2005. In 2008 she was the Arizona Capitol Times Leader of the Year in Public Policy and received the YWCA Business Leadership Award.

Lesher holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Arizona.

March 8th CEO Roundtable Featuring Matthew Hawkins

Please join Tucson Young Professionals and listen to Matthew Hawkins, CEO of Sunquest Information Systems

When/Where: March 8th, 5:30-7:00pm @ Union Public House

About CEO Roundtable:

Tucson Young Professionals holds a monthly CEO Roundtable as an avenue of professional development for our members and the community.

We ask our featured speaker to candidly speak for 30-35 minutes about their story of successes, pitfalls and laughs on their journey to becoming a successful leader.

The atmosphere is casual and conversational.

About Matthew Hawkins:

Please join Tucson Young Professionals and listen to Matthew Hawkins, CEO of Sunquest Information Systems

With a passion for healthcare and technology-enabled businesses, Matt leads the organization to help make healthcare smarter and patients safer through the delivery of innovative diagnostic and laboratory information systems to organizations across the globe. Prior to joining Sunquest, Matt served as president and board member of Greenway Health, chief executive officer and board member of Vitera Healthcare Solutions, chief executive officer and board member of SirsiDynix and vice president and general manager of Henry Schein Practice Solutions. Matt received an MBA from Harvard Business School and began his career after graduating with University Honors from Brigham Young University. Matt is deeply committed to volunteer service having held recent volunteer board positions with the Florida divisions of both the American Cancer Society and the American Heart Association.

February 9th CEO Roundtable Featuring Lesli Pintor

Please join Tucson Young Professionals and enjoy our roundtable with Lesli Pintor, Senior Vice President at National Bank of Arizona

When/Where: February 9th, 5:30-7:00pm @ Union Public House

About CEO Roundtable:

Tucson Young Professionals holds a monthly CEO Roundtable as an avenue of professional development for our members and the community.

We ask our featured speaker to candidly speak for 30-35 minutes about their story of successes, pitfalls and laughs on their journey to becoming a successful leader.

The atmosphere is casual and conversational.

About Lesli Pintor:

Lesli Pintor, a 31-year seasoned veteran of the financial services industry, has been with National Bank of Arizona for 19 years, where she currently develops and manages a portfolio of business client relationships. Her finance background also includes development and construction financing, credit policy development, and bank regulation. Lesli leads the bank’s Tucson Women’s Financial Group, dedicated to building business connections for professional women through financial health programs. She is also co-creator of the bank’s formal mentoring program, and is a certified facilitator for the bank’s Leadership Challenge initiative. She is a frequent speaker for various groups and events, and has received several awards for her community activities, the most recent of which was being inducted into the University of Arizona’s Beta Gamma Sigma chapter and being recognized as a Southwest Woman of Influence by Real Estate Forum magazine.
Lesli participated in the 2014-2015 International Women’s Forum Leadership Foundation Fellows Program for emerging global leaders. She currently serves on the Non Profit Loan Fund, the Pima Community College Foundation, and the AZ Earn to Learn boards of directors. Lesli is past president of CREW Tucson (Commercial Real Estate Women) and the Arizona Repertory Singers. She also regularly volunteers with the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. She is a native of Douglas, Arizona and is a proud Wildcat mom of a UA sophomore.

January 12th CEO Roundtable Featuring Lee Lambert

Please join Tucson Young Professionals and enjoy our roundtable with Lee Lambert, Chancellor of Pima Community College

When/Where: January 12th, 5:30-7:00pm @ Union Public House

About CEO Roundtable:

Tucson Young Professionals holds a monthly CEO Roundtable as an avenue of professional development for our members and the community.

We ask our featured speaker to candidly speak for 30-35 minutes about their story of successes, pitfalls and laughs on their journey to becoming a successful leader.

The atmosphere is casual and conversational.

About Lee Lambert:

Lee Lambert, Chancellor of Pima Community College, has been Chancellor since July 1, 2013.Chancellor Lambert formerly served on the Board of Directors of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) and in[masked] he served on AACC’s Executive Committee. He is a former chair of AACC’s Committee on Program Initiatives and Workforce Training.

Has been asked by the governments of China and India to speak to educators in those countries about the critical role community colleges can play in educating and training the workforce of the 21st century.

Keynote presenter for the AACC delegation at the World Federation of Colleges and Polytechnics World Congress in Beijing, October 2014.

Recently, Chancellor Lambert has received the National leadership award from Asian Pacific Americans in Higher Education “in recognition of your leadership in the field of higher education and your contributions to the API community,” April 2015. He also received award from Arizona’s chapter of Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) for service to the College’s student-veterans, May 2015.And was recognized by League of United Latin American Citizens Council 1057 at the group’s annual Educators Awards & Scholarship Banquet, April 2015.

In addition, he was named Man of the Year by the Pan Asian Community Alliance in Tucson, February 2015. He also is a Board member for the National Asian Pacific Islanders Council Advisory Board member and the Southern Arizona Council for International Visitors.

 

November 10th CEO Roundtable Featuring Todd Sadow

Please join Tucson Young Professionals and enjoy our roundtable with Todd Sadow, Co-founder & CEO of Epic Rides!

When/Where: November 10th, 5:30-7:00pm @ Union Public House

About CEO Roundtable:

Tucson Young Professionals holds a monthly CEO Roundtable as an avenue of professional development for our members and the community.

We ask our featured speaker to candidly speak for 30-35 minutes about their story of successes, pitfalls and laughs on their journey to becoming a successful leader.

The atmosphere is casual and conversational.

About Todd Sadow:

Todd Sadow, Co-founder & CEO of Epic Rides, is a graduate of the University of Arizona.

He has spent more than 15 years leading a renaissance within the mountain bike industry by developing a national mountain bike event model capable of servicing beginner, amateur and professional level athletes. The events provide endemic and non-endemic industries a platform to reach a critical mass of outdoor enthusiasts through a sophisticated business model that is attracting new dollars into a previously routed industry.

Todd has significant experience defining, developing and executing economic development projects for regional community and government(s) benefit. Most recently, Epic Rides launched its third event in the Epic Rides Off-Road Series in Nevada’s capitol – Carson City.

While sharing Epic Rides’ trajectory and fielding questions from the audience, Todd will speak about:

• The importance of high quality work output
• Evolving within your work environment
• Gratification that should come from small victories
• Rome wasn’t built in a day…

CEO Close Up with T. VanHook

After T. VanHook’s CEO Round Table event in August, we had a chance to sit down and find out a little bit more about her and lessons she’s learned as the Executive Director of Habitat for Humanity Tucson. Above is our flash interview with T., below is our full length close up interview.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Are you from Tucson originally? If not, how long have you lived here?

I come from a Tucson family, but I was raised in Cochise County. I came to Tucson when I graduated from high school to attend the University of Arizona. I’m not a Tucsonan, but I’m the family of Tucsonan, my father grew up here, we just lived elsewhere.

 

What is your favorite type of food and/or what is your favorite restaurant in Tucson?

That’s a hard question – I love Feast, they have a really varied menu that changes throughout the year so you can always find something great and different.

 

What kind of music do you listen to? Who’s your favorite artist?

Here in the office we mostly listen to throwback, like 70’s and 80’s music, a lot of Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young. I walk every morning to Rusted Root. I listen to a real variety of stuff – if you were to look in my phone you’d find a wide range of stuff.

In my office when people get stressed out, I play Krishna Das (which is played in a lot of yoga studies). When people think of nonprofits, people tend to think everyone’s holding hands and signing kumbaya. But the reality is that we’re all here because we have a passion for the mission of serving the community and sometimes those passions clash. Unless someone’s injured or killed – nothing is so urgent it can’t wait for 15 minutes. There’s this Krishna Das song which is kind of quiet and lasts about 14 minutes and we’ll play that and just sit on the couch. Anytime there’s a conflict and emotions are up people come in to my office and we chill, we listen to the one song, then we can say what’s going on. Music is really about the moment and what the mood prescribes.

 

Can you tell us about your educational background and how it led you to current leadership role at Habitat?

Sure, I have a degree in Art Education and a MA in Art Education from the University of Arizona. I went to the University of Frankfurt where I studied Aesthetic Theory. I did several internships in museums – none of which led to my current position.

 

So how did you end up falling into the executive leadership at Habitat? It sounds like you had a pretty different background from your current role.

It’s actually a quick leap. I think there are basic [relevant] skills, certainly when you’re doing post graduate research in philosophy, about writing, reasoning, and learning. After I finished studying at the University of Frankfurt, I came back to Tucson and worked in a little restaurant called Grill on Congress. Pat Benechik, who was the Executive Director at COPE Behavioral Services at the time, was a regular customer at Grill. Steve Liao was a City Council Member for the City of Tucson and he’d meet once a week with Pat.

COPE was looking for someone who could write, that would work for various departments, write grants, and do copy writing on various things. Steve Liao had told Pat I was a good writer, so one day he asked me if I’d be interested in working for COPE on a trial basis to do some writing. I went on a 90 day trial and with my first attempt at a federal grant we received $5.3 million.

Around 2002 they spun off something called RISE, which ran a homeless feeding center. I became the President and CEO of RISE. So, in my early 30’s, that was my first jaunt as a CEO of a nonprofit corporation. I stayed there until 2006, when the Town of Marana asked me to come out and look at their grant and affordable housing programs and I was there for eight and half years.

In 2000 my mother retired, and took a volunteer position in Habitat. She had no skills – zero skills in construction – she was a technical report writer. At the end of her first day, in January 2000, she called and said she’s going back. I said, “So you’re going to do construction?” She said “No, I figured out in about the first 20 minutes I don’t know how to do that, but they have regular people that come every week – I’m going to take their orders and make sandwiches for them.” She ended up doing that for almost two years. In 2002, they were doing a women’s build, and I was invited to be a part of it.

 

So that’s how you found out about the organization?

Absolutely, and unfortunately my mother passed away a couple years after she started here at Habitat. But it was a really wonderful legacy, and [Habitat] just seemed to be a good fit for me.

 

Do you have any hobbies? What do you do in your spare time?

I do a few things, I speed walk three to five miles every morning. That’s just to clear my head, think, listen to music, and get ready for the day. I make cards and I quilt. I also love to bake and cook – I like to make elaborate meals and I try to do that at least once a week for family and friends.

 

Do you have a leadership style you identify with?

Yes, I think every job on earth is equal. What is important is for people to know what their role is and how they fit into the bigger organization. I feel like my job as CEO isn’t to do everyone else’s job, it’s to get the right people in the right job and make sure they have the resources they need to complete the mission. It’s really about visioning and missioning. I have an entire wall in my office painted as a white board which I use and it’s there so people can come in, talk about, and illustrate how we all come together to make the system work so that we’re meeting our goals by the end of the year – that’s all that really matters.

I think it’s critical that we think things through, that we have people to talk things through with, and that we allow people to do the jobs they were hired to do. That means letting others make some of the decisions but every decision made in this corporation is my responsibility. I always say “I am responsible, I take full responsibility for my actions and I take full responsibility for the actions others take when I empower them to do so.” I think that’s really important: I’ve got everybody’s back, nobody’s going to be left out flailing because ultimately it’s my responsibility. I try to communicate that very fully to people.

 

What do you think is the key success factor to your personal leadership style?

I think it’s keeping it real, and I talked about this at the round-table event. There are really only a couple things you do as a leader. One, you have to be your genuine self, you have to put yourself out there – if it’s quirky or uptight – whatever it is, you have to be genuine to who you are and what your core values are. As soon as you start decision making or asking someone else to decision make contrary to their core values it’s a disaster for everyone.

Two, you have to be nice to everybody. Everybody has an equal say. You never know where the next great idea is going to come from and you want everyone in the organization to have ownership. So it’s really critical that you make sure it’s an inclusive environment. It’s knowing when to empower people to make decisions and when to take responsibility for a decision and say, I’m really excited to hear your feedback but ultimately this is my decision. The trick is making sure people understand when it isn’t a joint decision, when I’m going to listen to the feedback and think something over to make sure it’s the best decision, best fit, and best direction for the corporation.

 

Can you tell us about an obstacle you or your organization has faced and how it was overcome?

We’ve just come through, as an organization, a critical time of change. We had an amazing Executive Director, Michael McDonald who moved on to the Community Food Bank. Early in my conversations with Michael, he said something that really struck me, he said that he needed to put is eyes on something new, he needed a new challenge, he needed a change, and Habitat needed someone new to put their eyes on it. To the outside, it’s sometimes a negative when someone leaves or there’s big transition or big change. But here at Habitat, I think it’s been an extreme positive.

The legacy that Michael and his predecessors left was a really strong and stable organization. Now we have an opportunity to start adjusting our model, forecasting, and looking at the future so we can ensure the stability of the corporation. To the outside it looks like a set of hurdles – there’s turnover or all of these changes and that’s an obstacle – that perception.

In some cases change is very, very difficult. For long term employees change can be a huge obstacle. But what we have work through that together and continually communicate. My door is open, people can come in, and we can talk things through. Rumor mills are everywhere, external or internal in every workplace. Anyone that says that false information doesn’t move through their organization is either in denial or delusional. But I like to say let’s face it: here’s what I’ve heard, here’s what’s going on, and this is what I understand. Again, it’s where the whiteboard works – we can see by fiscal year where we want to move, what we want to do, and see a timeline of what we’re doing this year. Any person in this organization can come in and see exactly where we’re at.

I think change creates its own obstacles and what we had to do was figure out what chutes and ladders we needed to navigate that change, to make sure it was a comfortable transition for the people who transitioned with us, and that it was a comfortable landing or a positive move for people who did not stay with the organization. We’ve worked hard to do that, to make sure it’s a win-win.

 

Do you find that when people come to talk to you about change, that they leave here with a sense of calmness, that they know everything is going to be fine?

I think it can go both ways. Sometimes we talk really big ideas and I’ll tell people that the idea has to percolate in their brain for a bit and that they may have questions tomorrow or the next day. It may be more confusing once they see the big vision, but once they start settling in and they see they how things are going – you know it takes time to build trust. I’ve been here 14 months and I’ve worked hard to check in with every person every day. When I get here first thing in the morning I do a circle around of the building, say hello, see how their weekend was, and see what’s going on with everybody. It takes time for the vision or changes to really become ingrained in people. I hope people leave my office knowing they’ve been listened to and I hope they leave knowing that I care about their concerns, that I’ve been open with my answers. But sometimes, they aren’t leaving with clarity or self-confidence, but they come back.

 

A follow-up question: organizational change is a big deal, especially when leadership changes – was there anything really surprising or unexpected that you found in the transition? 

I was surprised a little bit at how hard the transition was for some key players. We had some public positions change and I was a little surprised early on when a department manager left after I had only been here 5 weeks. When we sat down to talk after they’d accepted another position, I found out they actually left based on an assumption. It wasn’t my intent at all – what their fear was – and we’ve continued our relationship since they left, we have lunch on a regular basis, and talk. I think it’s important to get those things out on the table and talk about them. What could’ve been an adversarial parting has actually been very positive for us and extremely positive for the person who left.

 

One more follow-up question: was there any sort of new skill or talent that you developed – maybe something that forced you outside of your comfort zone as a result of managing the leadership transition?

Transitions are just hard, people leaving is hard. I think I took it too personally – a lot harder than I thought I would. I remember speaking with a CEO, who I perceive as the sweetest, most loved person in Tucson, who told me that 40% of the staff left within her first 90 days because of new goals, new ideas, new objectives, and new processes. That conversation made me feel a little better – that she had had that amount of turnover.

CEOs are supposed to have these boundaries around them and it goes back to being your genuine self, I don’t think I intentionally put up boundaries, but early on to protect myself I maybe wasn’t as personally open with people, for example laughing or telling a story. As soon as I was able to kind of relax and do that, I met my husband.

He’d spoken at Building Freedom Day last year. I’d been to a SAHBA (Southern Arizona Home Builders Association), where he, Martha McSally, and a general from the Air Force talked about the transition of military families and some stuff around the A-10. I thought there’s someone really interesting and articulate about change within an organization.

So Colonel Schuld was speaking somewhere, and I called him, and I thought there’s someone out of sector that I could ask about how they handled transition, what they do, and so I went and interviewed him and asked about how he handled transition.

 

What is something would be surprised to find out about you?

I think people are surprised – because I’m a vegetarian, I have my dogs, I will not use plastic shopping bags – that I drive a race car that is a gas guzzler, but only on Sundays. I have a 2010 Ford Mustang Shelby GT 500 with 606 horsepower. I love the car and I work on it myself – I’m sort of a motor-head.

 

I think that qualifies as surprising – what’s your favorite road to go fast on?

Well, I try not to exceed the speed limit, but the new segment of Twin Peaks Road between I-10 and Dove Mountain Boulevard is a really beautiful and smooth road. Certainly the road between I-10 and Sonoita is a lovely one to drive with a Shelby Cobra.

 

Do you have a mentor or role model?

I would say Tom Donovan with COPE Behavioral Services is the smartest human being I have ever been around. He’s calm, he doesn’t believe in drama. He’s creative and then takes an analytical look at the ideas. He’s that person who’s not afraid to tell me when I’m full of it or that I’m not walking my talk. He’ll also tell me when I’m not taking a risk because of fear. He reminds me to think about what my values are and to be who I am and to bring what I am to the table. So, I think he’s critical in my life for almost 20 years – in fact he’d be great for CEO Round Table.

 

Last question, and it may be a little cliché – but asking people who have a lot of experience who’ve been around awhile can often give some interesting answers. So the question is – what is the meaning of life?

This is a good question for me. My first husband was terminally ill for a number of years. I cared for him at home and he passed in early 2013. You learn a lot about what your priorities are and who your friends are when you’re in that type of situation. I think people talk about a home/life balance – as something you need, but I’ll take it back to the idea that you have to be your authentic you. Every day is an amazing gift.

Near my desk there are two stickers that have traveled with me throughout my career. They say two things: “Good clothes (or in my case shoes) open all doors” and “Life isn’t about finding yourself, it’s about creating yourself.” Every day I make the decision, no matter what’s thrown at me, can I take a positive look at this or am I going to be negative? You’re entitled to a pity party, to your raw emotion. But we get to make choices every day. We can choose to make choices that may make the world a little better or that may not. So, I think for me the meaning of life is living every day and taking full advantage while not taking advantage of what’s around you. You have to live your life without damaging others or taking resources that don’t belong to you.

 

October 13th CEO Roundtable featuring Paul Bellows

 

Please join Tucson Young Professionals and enjoy our roundtable with Paul Bellows, Chief Executive Officer for”Be Good @ Doing Good”

When/Where: October 13th, 5:30-7:00pm @ Union Public House

About CEO Roundtable:

Tucson Young Professionals holds a monthly CEO Roundtable as an avenue of professional development for our members and the community.

We ask our featured speaker to candidly speak for 30-35 minutes about their story of successes, pitfalls and laughs on their journey to becoming a successful leader.

The atmosphere is casual and conversational.

About Paul Bellows:

Paul’s clients want to move from just knowledge, which is information, to understanding, which is awareness. They are already successful and yet they want more – they have a burning desire to make a bigger impact in the lives of their customers, employees, family and charities. Creating a better version of themselves and their business is now their primary goal.

As founder and CEO of “Be Good @ Doing Good,” Paul works with CEOs, entrepreneurs, business owners and non-profit executive directors to help them achieve their mission and “Be Good at Doing Good” in their communities and around the planet.

His specialties: Business & CEO Coaching; Strategist; Strategic Planning; Planning Retreats; Public Speaking; Facilitating Work Shops & Peer Advisory Groups; Author; Business, Non-profit & Leadership Coaching

Paul is 100% devoted to helping all types of caring organizations and business leaders become and do more. Since that never happens by accident, he is here to help you.

Special thanks to our partner, Citi!

August 11th CEO Roundtable featuring T. VanHook

vanhook roundtablePlease join Tucson Young Professionals and enjoy our roundtable with T. VanHook, Chief Executive Officer for Habitat for Humanity Tucson

When/Where: August 11th, 5:30-7:00pm @ Union Public House

About CEO Roundtable:

Tucson Young Professionals holds a monthly CEO Roundtable as an avenue of professional development for our members and the community.

We ask our featured speaker to candidly speak for 30-35 minutes about their story of successes, pitfalls and laughs on their journey to becoming a successful leader.

The atmosphere is casual and conversational.

About T. VanHook:

T. VanHook, Chief Executive Officer of Habitat for Humanity Tucson, is a graduate of the University of Arizona who has spent more than 20 years working in community-based human services, neighborhood, housing, and transit programs for public, private, and nonprofit organizations. She has vast experience facilitating community and governmental collaborative projects for special needs and low-income populations. Most recently, as Marana’s Community Development and Neighborhood Services Director, she was responsible for housing programs, grants management, public transit, special events, and community outreach. In 2010, Ms. VanHook received the Thomas A. Swanson Regional Leadership Award from the Pima Association of Governments for her support of regional transit initiatives and for the development of neighborhood outreach programs targeted at keeping residents up-to-date on private and government development in the Marana area.

Special thanks to our partner, Citi!

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July 14th- CEO Roundtable featuring Nathaniel Bradley

Please join Tucson Young Professionals and United Way Young Leaders Society members and listen to Nathaniel Bradley, Co-Founder, CEO, and Director of AudioEye, Inc.

About CEO Roundtable:

Through a partnership with Tucson Young Professionals and United Way’s Young Leaders Society we are holding monthly CEO Roundtable events as an avenue of professional development for our members.

We ask our featured speaker to candidly speak for 30-35 minutes about their story of successes, pitfalls and laughs on their journey to becoming a successful leader.

The atmosphere is casual and conversational.

About Nathaniel Bradley:

Nathaniel is the named inventor of several patented Internet and Mobile technology inventions. Mr. Bradley is a recognized pioneer and active expert in the new media and mobile Internet technology sector. He is also the named inventor of several Internet technology patents and patents pending with United States Patent & Trademark Office. Over the past decade, Mr. Bradley has been involved in the expansion, reduction to practice, mass commercialization and enforcement of Internet patents related to the customization of Internet content to end users. Mr. Bradley has been involved in the development and spin-out divestiture of VoiceAmerica, Radio Pilot, World Talk Radio & BoomBox Radio. He has been involved in the acquisition and consolidation of Internet Radio operations and mobile marketing operations including Augme Mobile in 2010. Bradley was also technical leader for the acquisition teams of then competitor Hipcricket for more than $44.5 million and Jag Tag, inc. for $5.3m both in 2011. Hipcricket, inc has emerged as a leading mobile marketing company in the United States and has completed more than 225,000 mobile marketing campaigns entering 2013. In 2015 Nathaniel was named a finalist for Entrepreneur of the Year in the desert mountain region by Ernst & Young.
Special thanks to our partner, Citi!

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June 9th – CEO Roundtable featuring Guy Gunther

Please join Tucson Young Professionals and United Way Young Leaders Society members and listen to Guy Gunther, VP of Operations at CenturyLink

About CEO Roundtable:

Through a partnership with Tucson Young Professionals and United Way’s Young Leaders Society we are holding monthly CEO Roundtable events as an avenue of professional development for our members.

We ask our featured speaker to candidly speak for 30-35 minutes about their story of successes, pitfalls and laughs on their journey to becoming a successful leader.

The atmosphere is casual and conversational.

About Guy Gunther:

Guy Gunther, formerly CenturyLink’s Vice President and General Manager of Tucson and Outstate Arizona, has been recently appointed the company’s Vice President of Operations for the entire State of Arizona. In his expanded role, Gunther will be responsible for operational results and customer satisfaction, representing the company in the community and with state and local leaders, and directing CenturyLink’s continued network investments in high speed broadband, Prism™ TV, and cloud infrastructure and hosted IT solutions for business customers. He will maintain offices in both Tucson and Phoenix. Gunther moved to Tucson in 2011 when CenturyLink acquired Qwest. Prior to this he worked ten years for Qwest in various leadership positions. He has previous experience in management consulting and with start-up companies in the technology and communications industries. Gunther is the current chairman of the Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities (TREO) and also serves on the boards of the Tucson Metro Chamber, the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum, the Southern Arizona Leadership Council, and the Catalina Council of the Boy Scouts of America. He and his wife, Karen, have two young children.
Special thanks to our partner, Citi!

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